Cardiometabolic Risk Factors and Early All-Cause Mortality among Young U.S. Individuals | American Diabetes Association
Year: 
2011
Abstract Number: 
1330-P
Cardiometabolic Risk Factors and Early All-Cause Mortality among Young U.S. Individuals A recent study among an Americ A recent study among an American Indian cohort found that elevated glucose levels were associated with early deaths. However, it is unknown how these findings extend to the general U.S. population and if similar patterns are present in other cardiometabolic risk factors or limited to glucose levels. To address this question, we used data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination survey (NHANES III), a nationally representative survey of non-institutionalized U.S. resides, conducted from 1988-1994 with follow-up for mortality status through the end of 2006 (mean 15.1 years follow-up). We included NHANES III participants age 12 to 39 years (n = 9245, mean age= 26.1 years) to focus on deaths occurring prior to 55 years of age. There were 298 deaths from all causes. We used proportional hazards models, with age as the time scale, to determine the risk of mortality associated with baseline measurements of body mass index (BMI), waist to height ratio, hemoglobin A1c, total and HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, hypertension and smoking after adjusting for sex, race/ethnicity and presence of co-morbid conditions.[br]The adjusted relative hazard (RH) for A1c [ge]6.5 compared to A1c [lt] 5.7 was significant (RH 2.52, 95% CI 1.23, 5.19). Waist to height ratio [ge] 0.65 compared to [lt] 0.5 was also significantly associated with increased risk of early death (RH 1.92, 95% 1.09, 3.40). BMI [ge]30 kg/m[sup]2[/sup] compared to BMI [lt] 25 kg/m[sup]2 [/sup]was not significantly associated with increased risk (RH 1.76, 95% CI0.77, 1.73); neither was hypertension (RH 1.39, 95% CI 0.79, 2.46). Elevated lipid levels, based on recommended treatment levels, were not significantly associated with early mortality. Self-reported smoking was associated with an increased risk of early death (RH 1.89 95% 1.27, 2.81).[br]In the U.S., high A1c levels, central obesity, and smoking are associated with an increased risk of early mortality among persons aged 12-39 years. Effective intervention strategies aimed at the reduction of these risk factors in younger US residents are warranted. SHARON SAYDAH, KAI BULLARD, GIUSEPPINA IMPERATORE, LINDA GEISS, EDWARD GREGG 1330-P Atlanta, GA Epidemiology
Author: 
SHARON SAYDAH
Congress: 
71st Scientific Sessions (2011)
Category: 
Epidemiology