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Click to add/remove this article to your list of 'My Favorites' Depressive symptoms and antidepressant use increase diabetes risk in postmenopausal women
November - 30 - 2011 

Links between depression, antidepressant use and diabetes have been reported but the mechanisms are still poorly understood. These associations were investigated using data from the Women's Health Initiative, an observational study which collected data on depression, diabetes and medication use for a mean follow-up of 7.6 years. The cohort consisted of 161,808 postmenopausal females. Diabetes status was based on self-reports of diagnosis or treatment and was documented at baseline and yearly thereafter. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Scale (CES-D) and medication use was based on self-reports cross-matched with a drug database. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) adjusted for multiple diabetes risk factors. Elevated depressive symptoms were reported by 15.5% of women at baseline and 6.9% were on antidepressants. These elevated symptoms and antidepressant use at baseline was associated with increased risk of newly diagnosed incident diabetes (HRs = 1.13 and 1.18, respectively). At year 3, the associations remained significant with HRs of 1.23 and 1.31, respectively. The results showed that depressive symptoms and antidepressant use were independently associated with diabetes risk in this patient population. The combination of the two variables did not have a compounded effect on this risk (Ma, Y. et al. Diabetes Care 2011, 34(11): 2390).