For results that have...

But don't include...

Abstract

Click to add/remove this article to your list of 'My Favorites' A 10-Second Sprint Performed after Moderate-Intensity Exercise Does Not Increase the Amount of Carbohydrate Required To Maintain Euglycemia in Individuals with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Year: 2011

Abstract Number: 759-P

Authors: RAYMOND J. DAVEY, VANESSA A. BUSSAU, NIRUBASINI PARAMALINGAM, EE MUN LIM, ELIZABETH A. DAVIS, TIMOTHY W. JONES, PAUL A. FOURNIER

Institutions: Perth, Western Australia, Austria, Perth, Western Australia, Australia

Results: Recently, we reported that performing a 10-second maximal sprint after moderate intensity exercise can prevent blood glucose levels from falling for the first 2 hours post-exercise, with no carbohydrate intake required to maintain euglycemia. However, it remains to be established whether performing a 10-second sprint after moderate intensity exercise increases the amount of carbohydrate required to maintain euglycemia late post-exercise compared to moderate intensity exercise alone. Seven individuals with type 1 diabetes (4 males, 3 females; aged 18.9 ± 4.6 years; duration of diabetes of 10.4 ± 4.2 years; glycated haemoglobin of 7.9 ± 0.7%, BMI of 26.3 ± 3.6 kg/m2, and VO2peak of 34.2 ± 8.4 ml kg-1 min-1, all mean ± SD) were subjected to a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and performed 30 minutes of moderate intensity exercise (40% VO2peak) followed by either a 10-second sprint or rest, with both treatments administered to all participants following a counterbalanced study design. Over the following 8 hours, glucose infusion rate (GIR) to maintain euglycemia was measured continuously. For the first 2 hours post-exercise and for the remainder of the recovery period there were no differences in blood glucose levels (5.5 ± 0.2 mmol/l versus 5.5 ± 0.2 mmol/l), plasma insulin concentrations (53.9 ± 11.1 µU/ml versus 46.8 ± 8.8 µU/ml) and GIR (15.7 ± 2.8 g/hr versus 15.6 ± 2.6 g/hr; all mean ± SEM) between treatments. In conclusion, a 10-second maximal sprint effort performed after 30-minutes of moderate intensity exercise does not increase the amount of glucose required to prevent late-onset post-exercise fall in glycemia in individuals with type 1 diabetes, thus suggesting that a short sprint sufficient to prevent early hypoglycemia does not increase the risk of late onset post-exercise hypoglycemia.

Category: Exercise - Human