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Click to add/remove this article to your list of 'My Favorites' A Low-Fat Supplemented with EPA and DHA Reduces the Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

Year: 2009

Abstract Number: 91-LB

Authors: JUAN ANTONIO PANIAGUA, PABLO PEREZ-JIMENEZ, JAVIER DELGADO-LISTA, FRANCISCO PEREZ-JIMENEZ, AUDREY C TIERNEY, JULIE A LOVEGROVE, CRISTIAN A. DREVON, CATHERINE DEFOORT, ELLEN E BLAAK, ALDONA DEMBINSKA-KIEC, BRITA KARLSTRÖM, ELLEN E ROCHE, JOSE LOPEZ-MIRANDA

Institutions: Cordoba, Spain, Dublin, Ireland, Reading, United Kingdom, Oslo, Norway, Marseilles, France, Maastricht, The Netherlands, Krakow, Poland, Uppsala, Sweden

Results: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is characterised by hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, abdominal obesity and hypertension. The syndrome affects most developed countries and confers increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. To investigate the effects of four diets with different fat quantity and quality for the prevention of the MetS (The LIPGENE proyects). This study included 337 volunteers with at least 3 components of National Cholesterol Education Program MetS criteria from eight European centers. They were randonly assigned to one of four diets: two high fat diets rich in saturated fat (HFSFA) or monounsaturated fat (HFMUFA) and two low-fat, high complex carbohydrate diets without (LFHC-control) and with (LFHC n-3) 1,24 g/day of very long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (VLC n-3 PUFA) supplementation for 12 weeks. All diets were isocaloric, and there was no changes in physical activity during any of intervention. The type and number of MetS criteria were recorded before and after each intervention. At baseline, 100% of participants met the criteria for the MetS (3=40,4%, 4=38,6% AND 5=21%), The abdominal circumference (>102 for men and > 88 cm for women) was meet by 94,4%, blood pressure by 88,4%, fasting glucose (≥ 5,6 mmol/L) 51,3%, triacilglycerols (≥ 1,7 mmol/L) by 51,3% and HDL cholesterol (< 1,0 mmol/L for men and < 1,3 mmol/L for women) by 72,7% of volunteers. Each factor was randonly distributed and was not significantly different between diets at baseline. After intervention, MetS was decreased by 12,3% following SFA rich diet, 12,0% with MUFA rich diet, 10,3% with LFCHO rich diet and 25,0% with LFHC n3 diet (p < 0,05), In conclusion, an isocaloric low-fat diet supplemented with VLC n-3 PUFA rewduced the risk of metabolic syndrome compared with high fat and LFHC diets.[figure1]

Category: Nutrition - Clinical

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